Aaron Swartz Rolls Over in his Grave as We Ignore the Rise of the Privatized Surveillance State (and even pay for it)

by Scott Creighton

What was everyone concerned about back then? That the NSA would track our every move, record all of our calls and spy on us even in the sanctity of our own homes, right?Remember those days?

While that fight was going on, that was the biggest thing in the world. Our constitutional right to be secure in our persons and property was under siege from the big bad GUBMINT and we just had to do something.

That particular “crisis” was created by a CIA employee by the fake name of “Edward Snowden” and his PR team headed up by Glenn Greenwald. It’s what I called the ‘Manufactured Hero” story.

The whole thing was a scam from the very beginning and a few of us out here called it out for what it was immediately. We were called the “Snowden Truthers” and soundly attacked from all sides.

The truth of the matter was, Big Business was licking it’s chops at the prospect of getting CISPA passed through congress in the years before the “Snowden” psyop but they were thwarted by a concerted effort from a lot of online activists who understood that the overall plan was to privatize the surveillance state so they could profit from that aspect of the info they collected and also profit from the selling of that data they harvested.

Aaron Swartz almost single-handedly stopped CISPA the first time around, so they made sure he wasn’t around for their final effort. They “found” him hanging in his closet in New York exactly three months prior to Greenwald’s “Snowden” revelation and just two months prior to a number of Big Business representatives going to congress and demanding they pass CISPA in the new congress.

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Surveillance State Repeal Act: Real Reform or Just More Posturing?

by Scott Creighton

The Surveillance State Repeal Act (H.R. 1466), submitted in the House of Representatives by lawmakers Mark Pocan (D-Wis.) and Thomas Massie (R-Ky.) is turning a few heads in Washington.

The bill promises to do a number of things many of us out here on the fringes have been calling for over the past decade or so like repealing the Patriot Act and erasing all that data the government has been collecting and storing on us for over a decade.

The question is: is it a real effort at reform or merely posturing on the part of a few representatives making ready for 2016?

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